Finding Fall, Part 4: Watersprite Lake
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Intro: So I’m incredibly excited to introduce this new series, highlighting some known and lesser-known (but equally beloved) Canadian trails. Earlier this year, I partnered with MEC to ask trail runners across Canada what their favourite trails were. I was blown away by how passionate everyone was about “their” trail, and many of them were ones I’d never heard of before. It got me thinking about what makes a trail special. Is it because it’s the “old faithful” route we run twice a week? Is it our “love to hate” route with that one big climb in the middle that we just won’t let beat us? Or is it a bucket list trail that we spent years lusting after before we ever got to explore it?

In this series, I’m going to explore some of those trails and what makes them special…and what better time to do it than in the fall, as the leaves turn golden and the trails are at their very best?

**If you missed Part 1, Part 2, or Part 3, start with those!

Still with me? Yay! Here we go. Part 4.

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The Details:  

Where: Watersprite Lake, Squamish

When: May to October (snow dependent)

Distance: 17km roundtrip

Time: (4-6 hours moderate pace, plus allow time to admire the lake’s colours)

Terrain: The BCMC has done a ton of trail work up here in the last year, resulting in a really runnable first and last 6km. The final few km to the lake get more technical, with a couple of stable boulder fields and a steep final climb to navigate. The trail is well marked.

Pro Tip: It may only be 20km to the trailhead along the Mamquam Forest Service Road, but it will take a solid hour to get there, and you will need more than 2wd. Don’t forget to gas up so you aren’t coasting down the hills in neutral like we were!

Beloved By:

Hailey Van Dyk (@haileyvandyk). Hailey is a Squamish local who has run on incredible trails all over the world, and yet she still ranks Watersprite Lake as one of her all-time favourite routes.

I asked her why, and Hailey told me that she loves how the community (especially the BCMC) have come together to continually improve this trail and the lake access, including building a little cabin up there for people to enjoy. It’s a local favourite, with good reason!

 Heading up the super runnable first 6km.

Heading up the super runnable first 6km.

 Annnnd into the not so runnable boulder fields.

Annnnd into the not so runnable boulder fields.

The Route:

The trail is flowy and runnable, with a view that is hard to beat, and Hailey loves/hates using this gradual uphill route for hill training. If you’ve got to run the hills, at least make the view at the top worth it…right?

 Pit stops to snack on wild blueberries make everything better.

Pit stops to snack on wild blueberries make everything better.

 Ohhhh that’s a view worth working for, isn’t it?

Ohhhh that’s a view worth working for, isn’t it?

This is not a lake where one simply turns around and leaves, without at least taking a few minutes to soak it all in (and maybe go for a quick swim!).

 Hit pause.

Hit pause.

 And then maybe go for a little swim while trying to circumnavigate the lake.

And then maybe go for a little swim while trying to circumnavigate the lake.

 On the way down, revel in those fall colours and that gradual downhill grade.

On the way down, revel in those fall colours and that gradual downhill grade.

Gear Picks:

Hailey loves her MEC Mission Possible Zip Top for fall layering, and her Salomon Adv Skin 12L pack (for storing emergency gear like extra food, layers, a headlamp, and first aid).

I hope you’ve enjoyed this series as much as I have! Do you have a favourite trail that I should check out next? Send me an email or DM… I’d love to hear it!

xo

Hilary MathesonComment
Finding Fall, Part 3: Meet Montreal
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Intro: So I’m incredibly excited to introduce this new series, highlighting some known and lesser-known (but equally beloved) Canadian trails. Earlier this year, I partnered with MEC to ask trail runners across Canada what their favourite trails were. I was blown away by how passionate everyone was about “their” trail, and many of them were ones I’d never heard of before. It got me thinking about what makes a trail special. Is it because it’s the “old faithful” route we run twice a week? Is it our “love to hate” route with that one big climb in the middle that we just won’t let beat us? Or is it a bucket list trail that we spent years lusting after before we ever got to explore it?

In this series, I’m going to explore some of those trails and what makes them special…and what better time to do it than in the fall, as the leaves turn golden and the trails are at their very best?

**If you missed Part 1 or Part 2, start with those!

Still with me? Yay! Here we go. Part 3.

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The Details:  

Where: Mont-Royal, Montreal - aka a slice of trail running heaven in an otherwise urban city.

When: year-round

Distance: Chemin Olstead is a 6.5km loop, plus lots of add-on options

Time: how good is your cardio?

Terrain: Check out some trail options here. There is a nice mix of paved, gravel, and dirt trails to explore, plus the daunting Olstead stairs if you want a heart rate spike.

Pro Tip: Fall is the best time of year to explore this park, although in the winter you can run the trails (with micro spikes), and also add in some crazy-carpet or ice skating fun at the top.

Beloved By:

Jee Lam (@thejeelam). A Vancouver transplant now happily settled in Montreal, Jee is a professional ballet dancer and former Grouse Grind enthusiast, and the lush parks of Mont Royal have become her perfect urban trail escape. Without a car, options to escape into nature are more limited, so the bike ride to and from the park serves as a bonus workout.

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The Route:

Mont Royal is a forest oasis in a concrete jungle. Reminiscent of Vancouver’s Stanley Park, Mont Royal offers lush, wooded paths that switchback their way uphill before finally topping out with amazing view of the city below. For those lacking the vehicle access needed to head to parks outside the city centre (Mount Orford, for example, is a popular nearby running destination, although it is over an hour’s drive from Montreal), it offers a feasible transit/bike friendly alternative.

 Taking in the view from the top.

Taking in the view from the top.

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Montreal’s winters are long and cold, and locals are clearly relishing the lingering warmth of fall while it lasts.

 Circumnavigating Beaver Lake. In the winter, you can take a shortcut and ice skate across it!

Circumnavigating Beaver Lake. In the winter, you can take a shortcut and ice skate across it!

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While the paved paths are often quite busy with tourists and exercisers of varying abilities, it becomes peaceful very quickly once you veer off into the maze of trails.

 And sometimes, all we need is a little dose of tree therapy to make things right with the world again.

And sometimes, all we need is a little dose of tree therapy to make things right with the world again.

Gear Picks:

Jee rocked her MEC Mission Possible Zip Top, as well her MEC Mercury Thermal Tights. ...perfect for blocking that fall chill in the air.

Next Up:

I’m heading back to the west coast, hunting for those fall leaves. Stay tuned for Part 4/4, coming shortly!

Hilary MathesonComment
Finding Fall, Part 2: Exploring the Coquihalla Summit Area
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Intro: So I’m incredibly excited to introduce this new series, highlighting some known and lesser-known (but equally beloved) Canadian trails. Earlier this year, I partnered with MEC to ask trail runners across Canada what their favourite trails were. I was blown away by how passionate everyone was about “their” trail, and many of them were ones I’d never heard of before. It got me thinking about what makes a trail special. Is it because it’s the “old faithful” route we run twice a week? Is it our “love to hate” route with that one big climb in the middle that we just won’t let beat us? Or is it a bucket list trail that we spent years lusting after before we ever got to explore it?

In this series, I’m going to explore some of those trails and what makes them special…and what better time to do it than in the fall, as the leaves turn golden and the trails are at their very best?

**If you missed Part 1, start here:

Still with me? Yay! Here we go. Part 2.

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The Details:  

Where: Flatiron Peak (easier option), or Needle Peak (technical summit, advanced option)

When: June - October, but can be snowshoed in the winter

Distance: 13km round trip out and back to do either Needle or Flatiron. Add 4km to do both.

Time: 5 – 8 hours trail run, depending on how often you stop to enjoy the views…and there are many.

Terrain: Both trails lead up to a junction at the Needle saddle. Flatiron Peak is a beautiful route featuring a pretty little alpine lake. Needle Peak has a 1km steep, technical scramble to the summit, where route finding isn’t obvious, and a fall would be bad. Only attempt Needle Peak if you have scrambling/climbing experience and are comfortable with route finding and some exposure. Flatiron Peak is still a very lovely alternative.

Pro Tip: If you go in September, the blueberry bushes turn all shades of red, painting the meadows in gorgeous fall colours.

Beloved By:

Me!! True story, this is one of my very favourite, super secret trails… and now I’m sharing it with you. Aw. But please, PLEASE, take my warning seriously about Needle Peak. It is not a beginner route, so if you aren’t sure whether you should attempt it, that is your answer. Turn right at the junction, and go enjoy the beautiful route that is Flatiron Peak.

**Right about now, you might be asking why this post features my favourite trail, when it’s supposed to be highlighting trails beloved by other IG trail runners. The simple answer is that our original plan for the day got changed due to unexpected snowfall in the alpine (it happens, even in September!). I knew this trail was close by, so I asked my friend Andrea Lawson, who was already set to adventure with me for the day, if she wanted to explore one of my own personal favourite trails instead.

So there you have it. Oh, and why is it my favourite, you ask? Because it features a perfect mix of solid uphill, meadow frolicking, and technical scrambling…and because on the scale of views ><effort required, the Coquihalla Summit Area is unparalleled.

About Andrea (@andrea.lawson): She’s a badass strength coach, entrepreneur, and she owns a fitness rehab facility called Balance In Motion. She has been an athlete for years, but has recently started trail running, and is now on a mission to explore every inch of trail that she can find. Having her with me for this adventure was so much fun, because it allowed me to show her one of MY favourite areas — and I’m pretty sure it’s now one of hers as well.

The Route:

Find driving directions here.

The trail starts off fairly flat for about, oh, five minutes, before it cranks uphill in a sustained but efficient push towards the alpine. This part of the trail is well marked and maintained, and you should have no trouble following it (pro tip: just keep looking up, you’ll see the blazes). After about 30-40 minutes of uphill, you will start to see hints of sub-alpine terrain appear. Shortly, the trail begins to ease off, and you can actually catch your breath and admire the views. On a clear day, you can look behind you and see the imposing face of Yak Peak staring back at you.

From here, you meander through some beautiful sub-alpine meadows…aka one of my favourite parts of this route. The trail gently follows a ridgeline for several km, and in September the leaves are alight with colour.

 Those fall colours, right!!!

Those fall colours, right!!!

Keep going, and eventually you will find yourself at a junction, with a signpost marking the way to Needle Peak (to your left), and Flatiron Peak (slightly to your right). See my notes at the beginning of this piece for whether you should do Needle, Flatiron, or both.

 And into a cloud we go, heading towards the trail junction. We were amazed to see a fresh dusting of snow already!

And into a cloud we go, heading towards the trail junction. We were amazed to see a fresh dusting of snow already!

Flatiron Peak

We headed here first, as we were now immersed in a giant cloud and had almost zero visibility. Attempting Needle Peak in these conditions would have been a reallllly bad plan. I always love visiting the little alpine lake that nestles below Flatiron Peak, so we headed there happily.

 Andrea enjoying some moody PNW vibes.

Andrea enjoying some moody PNW vibes.

 The Alpine Lake, unlocked!

The Alpine Lake, unlocked!

We hit the alpine lake (I really don’t think it has a name, so I’ll just keep calling it that) after a couple of km, and headed up to the summit of Flatiron Peak…or so we hoped, as we couldn’t quite see it in the clouds.

 Hey look! Hints of a summit view! And fresh snow as a bonus reminder that winter is coming.

Hey look! Hints of a summit view! And fresh snow as a bonus reminder that winter is coming.

 One must always travel with  warm layers  in the alpine.

One must always travel with warm layers in the alpine.

As we headed down from Flatiron Peak, the clouds that had shrouded our views suddenly parted, and we were in a whole new world of glorious mountains and 360 degree views.

 All of a sudden, that same alpine lake took on a whole new level of beauty. It’s amazing what a bit of blue sky does.

All of a sudden, that same alpine lake took on a whole new level of beauty. It’s amazing what a bit of blue sky does.

With the weather now beautiful and warm, we decided to tag Needle Peak as well. This was my fourth time up to the summit, but even so I found that I still had to pay attention to the small cairns and subtle markers as we went.

 Back to the junction we go.

Back to the junction we go.

Needle Peak

 It’s steeper than it looks, especially on the way down.

It’s steeper than it looks, especially on the way down.

 And up we go.

And up we go.

 Assessing our route.

Assessing our route.

 Did I mention this summit involves a fair amount of scrambling?

Did I mention this summit involves a fair amount of scrambling?

 Annnd summit! Mountains as far as the eye can see!

Annnd summit! Mountains as far as the eye can see!

 What goes up, must come down. So many mountain rescues happen because people forget that its often harder (and much scarier) coming down steep terrain. Don’t be that person. Play within your limits!

What goes up, must come down. So many mountain rescues happen because people forget that its often harder (and much scarier) coming down steep terrain. Don’t be that person. Play within your limits!

I’m sure you can see why this trail is so near and dear to me. It features incredible alpine that’s easily accessible, with beautiful meadows and ridgelines to play on. If you are looking to venture out of the Sea to Sky corridor, this area is a must.

Gear Picks:

Andrea rocked her MEC Nephele Merino Long Sleeve Tee, as well her MEC Pace Running Vest. You’ll also want to be sure to have plenty of food, water, and a headlamp. And don’t forget to leave a trip plan with someone you trust!

Next Up:

I’m heading further east, hunting for those fall leaves. Stay tuned for Part 3/4, coming shortly!

Hilary MathesonComment
Finding Fall, Part 1: Exploring Skoki
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So I’m incredibly excited to introduce this new series, highlighting some known and lesser-known (but equally beloved) Canadian trails. Earlier this year, I partnered with MEC to ask trail runners across Canada what their favourite trails were. I was blown away by how passionate everyone was about “their” trail, and many of them were ones I’d never heard of before. It got me thinking about what makes a trail special. Is it because it’s the “old faithful” route we run twice a week? Is it our “love to hate” route with that one big climb in the middle that we just won’t let beat us? Or is it a bucket list trail that we spent years lusting after before we ever got to explore it?

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In this series, I’m going to explore some of those trails and what makes them special…and what better time to do it than in the fall, as the leaves turn golden and the trails are at their very best?

So without further ado: I’m very excited to partner with MEC once again to highlight a few of our favourite fall trails across Canada.

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Oh, Fall. That glorious shoulder season of excessive pumpkin spice everythingness, premature Halloween advertisements, and gloriously crunchy leaves. For trail runners, it’s a veritable paradise. Dry trails, buffed clean by summer’s heavier foot traffic, haven’t yet made the transition to winter’s more treacherous conditions. The leaves smell crisp and musty, and the colourful yellows, reds, and oranges bathe the trees and breathe new life into the forest. 

I love all seasons, but I love Fall best. All my summer races have been run, and the training has been done and dusted. What remains are easy, long, social runs with no goals other than finding new-to-me places to explore. And what better place to start than in the heart of the Rockies?

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Home to the cozy Skoki Ski Lodge, which is a popular backcountry skiing destination in the winter, the valley also boasts a beautiful trail network -- best enjoyed before the snow settles in. These trails come alive in the fall, as the larches turn the terrain golden. If you’re lucky, you might see a pica or a marmot scurrying around as well!

The Details:  

Where: Skoki, just north of Lake Louise.

When: July – September

Distance: ~30km round trip loop from the lower parking lot. Approx. 1796m elevation gain.

Time: 5 – 8 hours trail run, depending on how often you stop to enjoy the views…and there are many. Can also be done as a long one-day hike, or there are camping spots along the way if you want to take your time.

Terrain: Beautiful, runnable single track, with a 3km forest service road out and back at the beginning and end.

Pro Tip: You can do this route as an out and back to Skoki Lodge, or you can make it into a lollipop like we did by going over Deception Pass on the way there, and then turning left at the (literal) fork when you get to the lodge, and coming back over Packer’s Pass. The trail intersections are marked, and the trails are fairly easy to follow.

Beloved By:

I can’t take credit for knowing about this trail: that honour goes to my good friend Jen Segger, who is also one of the most badass women I happen to know. She’s a professional adventure racer, and coaches athletes all over the world when she isn’t winning multi-day races. When she told me about this route and shared that it had been on her bucket list for almost ten years, I couldn’t resist the chance to check it out with her. Jen is someone that has explored almost every inch of BC – if she says it’s worth the trip, I don’t need to be asked twice. We grabbed a few trail buddies, and off we went to discover Skoki.

 The trail starts off with a 3km or so jaunt up a Forest Service Road. No pictures of that part, sorry. The views quickly get better as you head onto flowy singletrack, and you are soon running next to the beautiful Ptarmigan Lake.

The trail starts off with a 3km or so jaunt up a Forest Service Road. No pictures of that part, sorry. The views quickly get better as you head onto flowy singletrack, and you are soon running next to the beautiful Ptarmigan Lake.

 Fall colours abound as you meander and slowly gain elevation towards Deception Pass.

Fall colours abound as you meander and slowly gain elevation towards Deception Pass.

 Cresting Deception Pass. It’s (mostly) downhill from here to the turnaround point at Skoki Lodge.

Cresting Deception Pass. It’s (mostly) downhill from here to the turnaround point at Skoki Lodge.

 Approaching the Lodge, approximately 14km or so into the day. In the summer, you can stay there and use it as a home base for hiking day trips (and there are endless possibilities!). Word on the street is that Jen might be putting together a 2019 trail running adventure here…just saying.

Approaching the Lodge, approximately 14km or so into the day. In the summer, you can stay there and use it as a home base for hiking day trips (and there are endless possibilities!). Word on the street is that Jen might be putting together a 2019 trail running adventure here…just saying.

 Oh hey look! A literal fork! I did promise you one, and here it is… pointing straight towards Packer’s Pass. The back half of this loop was by far my favourite, and you’ll soon see why.

Oh hey look! A literal fork! I did promise you one, and here it is… pointing straight towards Packer’s Pass. The back half of this loop was by far my favourite, and you’ll soon see why.

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 One of the cooler parts of this pass was how you climbed up and over two big ledges, each encasing a stunning glacial lake.

One of the cooler parts of this pass was how you climbed up and over two big ledges, each encasing a stunning glacial lake.

 Yes, it was as blue as it looks. And yes, it was just as cold.

Yes, it was as blue as it looks. And yes, it was just as cold.

 Getting a bird’s eye view of where we had come from. It just doesn’t get any better.

Getting a bird’s eye view of where we had come from. It just doesn’t get any better.

If you are looking to find fall in the Rockies, but you don’t want to get sucked into the crowds and chaos of Lake Louise or Moraine Lake, look no farther than Skoki. The trailhead is just five minutes north of the highway at Lake Louise, and you’ll be amazed at how quickly you can escape the typical tourists and find your own slice of single-track heaven.

Gear Picks:

You’ll need a good pack for your adventures, especially when venturing further afield in a place as remote as the Rockies. Jen rocked her go-to Ultimate Direction pack, which has 13L for carrying emergency gear and safety equipment. Speaking of safety equipment, bear spray is a must, and so is having a warm layering piece ready to pull out when you stop to take in those epic views. I’ve worn and loved MEC’s Uplink Jacket for over seven years now (and it’s still going strong)! The key with the Rockies is to recognize that the weather can change quickly, so being prepared is essential. Happy trails!

Next Up: I’m heading further west. Stay tuned for Part 2/4, coming shortly!

Hilary MathesonComment
What Happens When the High Goes MIA?

The Runner’s High. It’s tattooed on my thigh, reminding me with each stride that this is why I run; for that elusive, giddy and euphoric feeling that only running long (long) distances seems to bring me. I thought I had the formula figured out for how to tap into it: sign up for races longer than 100km, and insert feelings of utter bliss and gleeful romping.

It’s been two years since my last long race (Fat Dog 120), and Cascade Crest 100m was to be my big return. I signed on with rockstar coach David Roche in April, and all summer we worked towards getting me healthy and ready for a long day of romping through the Cascade Mountains. A 50k race/practice run, Bucking Hell 50k, landed me on the podium with a nice little “you are ready” confidence boost, and I approached my big race feeling fit and ready to have the best day (and night) ever. 

The day before the race dawned, and with it some real-life stress. My faithful old doggie, Odin, had had a stroke overnight. He’s come to all my big races for years, been my constant companion every day while I work from home, and I was devastated to see him in such pain. While Odin headed to the vet ER with my boyfriend, I left to drive down to Washington state for my race in tears, hoping that he’d make it to my finish line and everything would somehow be all right. 

Toeing the start line the next morning was an oddly surreal experience. Most of my family had driven down to support me and watch me crush my race, and yet Odin’s absence seemed looming. The unexpected arrival of my period the night before the race further added to my emotional state. As the race started, I found myself thinking: “let’s just get this thing over with.” Not an awesome attitude to go into a 100 mile race with, but it seemed like the only one I could muster given my mood.

Heading up the first climb, my legs felt heavy; oddly so, and slightly crampy — “Just great”, I thought to myself. Only 5 miles into a 100 mile race, and I felt like I’d run 30. I would normally nip these thoughts in the bud and try to focus on how beautiful the ridge was that we were running along, and how lucky I was to be there, but on this day I just didn’t wanna cheer up. So I didn’t. My friends Sawna and Ely were running close to me at that point, and they admitted that they were also feeling fairly crappy for so early on in the race. “Perfect,” I announced. “Misery loves company, so let’s all stick together.” We did, and I proceeded to break one of my cardinal rules of ultrarunning — never ever acknowledge the pain out loud. 

They are a funny thing, our brains. They often require a visual to associate with pain, in the same way that we won’t feel anything from a small cut until we look down and see it bleeding. I’ve always believed that it’s better not to give voice to the struggles for fear of validating them. And yet here I was, 20 miles into a 100 mile day, announcing that everything hurt, I wasn’t having any fun, and I didn’t really want to be there. And you know what? It felt kind of good to say, at least for a few minutes, until I realized it hadn’t actually made me feel any better. It had only served to add fuel to my grumpy.

 Coming into Tacoma Pass at mile 25 with Sawna and Ely.&nbsp; I swear that smile, however convincing, was fake.

Coming into Tacoma Pass at mile 25 with Sawna and Ely.  I swear that smile, however convincing, was fake.

I’d love to tell you that I didn’t allow myself to death march through some of the prettiest single track that I’ve ever seen, choking down food and mostly preoccupied with scanning my body for pains strong enough to give me a reason to DNF. I was frustrated that I wasn’t enjoying myself and “having fun”, as if that was some sort of guaranteed outcome that I was entitled to. Things that wouldn’t be quite as devastating on a good day (such as my crew missing me by 2 minutes at the second big aid station) sent me further down the rabbit hole, even though some very nice strangers and friends offered me headlamps, food, jackets, and acted as my honourary crew. My friend Kim was at this aid station sending updates to our coach David about how I was doing, and all I could muster was: “Tell him I’m hanging in there.” “That’s it?” She asked with her eyebrows raised. “Yep”, I replied grimly as I marched onwards. 

 Mile 48. My family (who missed me by a mere 2 minutes at Stampede Pass (mile 36 AS), drove like maniacs up forest service roads to catch up to me at one of the smaller AS, just to make sure I had enough food and gear to make it to my next big stop. What a gang. &lt;3

Mile 48. My family (who missed me by a mere 2 minutes at Stampede Pass (mile 36 AS), drove like maniacs up forest service roads to catch up to me at one of the smaller AS, just to make sure I had enough food and gear to make it to my next big stop. What a gang. <3

From mile 36 to 54 I trucked along mostly in silence, with Sawna and Ely as my companions in suffering, trying to figure out if there was a way to salvage my race and turn my day around. I’ve been reading Deena Kastor’s excellent book Let the Mind Run Free lately, and her words kept cycling through my head. One thought in particular stuck out: “Our happiness depends on the habit of mind we cultivate.” The thought of spending another 12 hours in my current cycle of negativity seemed intolerable, so I decided to try to change that.

First, I asked myself: Why was I being so negative? Was it because I didn’t feel very well and everything seemed like more work than it should be? Or the fact that I was moving slower than I wanted to/expected to? Or was it that I was used to always being happy during races even when I was suffering, and I didn’t know how to deal with a day that was just plain ol’ tough? 

I wasn’t sure, but I decided that didn’t actually matter. The point was that I still had +50 miles to go, and those miles were an opportunity to do things differently...starting with no more whining. I rolled into Hyak AS at 54 miles looking like shit (as my family told me later, they were placing bets on how long it would be before I dropped) — but for the first time I felt like I actually wanted to try to finish. To my absolute delight, Odin and my boyfriend were also waiting here, as they had driven down to catch me as soon as they got the go-ahead from the vet. I changed my socks and shoes for a slightly bigger version to accommodate my swelling feet, swapped my soaking wet shirt and windbreaker out for some dry layers, and headed into the dark night with my super pacer Tom.

Let’s talk about Tom for a minute. Tom coaches Olympic-level swimmers as his day job, and thinks running 50 miles with near-strangers through the night is “super fun”. Turns out, Tom was the perfect person to help me turn my day around. He knew I had been struggling — it was written all over my face every time he’d seen me — but he refused to acknowledge it. He cheerfully suggested we run the hills (say what?!), helpfully pointed out that the 3rd place woman was only 13 minutes ahead of me leaving the last AS, and politely insisted we try to catch her. I allowed myself to get swept up into the fun of the chase, and each section of the two hour climb we were presently on became a unique challenge. How much of it could I shuffle run? How many cardboard calories could I choke down while I power hiked? And most importantly: how could I better reframe this story? 

Every hill is an opportunity. Every hill is a fucking opportunity. I repeated this to myself ad nauseum, until I actually believed it. I forced my dormant facial muscles to smile just because, and as we hit each AS I thanked each volunteer, as I had done all race...but this time, I really meant it. “Thank you for being out here all night in the cold and rain,” I said loudly and as often as I could. It reminded me as much as them how grateful I was for the people that were making this race — my race — possible. We passed the 3rd place woman along this section, but it strangely didn’t even give me a boost of adrenaline or speed. I had decided by then that my race would be a successful one, regardless of my results, and all I had to do was execute that goal. 

I knew the switch was officially flipped when we hit the 75 mile mark and I sang a rousing, slightly off-tune rendition of Happy Birthday to one of the older gentlemen who was kindly volunteering there. The funny thing about exuding positivity is that it comes back to you like a boomerang, and the fact that I’d successfully broken the negative cycle only made me feel better and better as I went. I was still struggling, I still didn’t feel great and my legs still weren’t working as well as I wanted them to, but I was choosing to not let those things define my day — so they weren’t. We powered through the last 25 miles, with me setting the pace and pushing as hard as I could. We were gaining ground on the 2nd place woman, Jennifer, and with every AS we drew a little closer. 45 minutes, then 30, then 25, then 18, then finally she was only 10 minutes ahead with 4 miles left to go. It gave me something to focus on as we tried to close the gap, and yet I truly felt like I’d already won just by being able to turn my day around and dig myself out of my giant hole of wallowing. Just finishing was my gold medal, and I was going to get it.

 Coming into the homestretch with Tom, who shared 46 awesome miles (and almost no views) with me.&nbsp;

Coming into the homestretch with Tom, who shared 46 awesome miles (and almost no views) with me. 

I crossed the finish line in third place with a time of 23:39:45, 6 minutes behind 2nd place, with Odin, my boyfriend, and my family at the finish line to cheer me in. I felt like I’d won the whole freaking race. I beat me, in a battle that lasted almost twenty-four hours and required more mental strength than physical. They say we need the bad days to appreciate the good ones, and I think I finally understand what they meant by that. I’ve always said that I run to feel most alive. What I realized while I was out there slogging away, however, is that not every day can be the best day ever — but that doesn’t mean it has to automatically be a bad one. This race yielded no runner’s high — no frolicking, no moments of pure joy or easy bliss. What it did yield, however, were opportunities: for growth, for changing my narrative, and for learning how to flex and challenge my mental tenacity. 

 Oh my heart. Odin rallied post-stroke to fill his usual role as head cheerleader and salt-licker.

Oh my heart. Odin rallied post-stroke to fill his usual role as head cheerleader and salt-licker.

I would like to congratulate both Sawna and Ely, who also rallied to pull off awesome races and finish strong. So grateful to have shared those miles with you, friends. I'd also like to thank Tom for the role he played in my journey and all of his encouragement through the long night... I'm very much looking forward to more adventures with you. I would also like to thank Sean Causier from Twist Conditioning for getting me strong and keeping me from turning into a "noodle" runner, and my coach, David, for believing in me and challenging me to be my best...and for always supporting me even when I take detours along the way.

But wait, there's more! I'd further like to thank Rich, Adam, and the entire cast and crew of volunteers that make Cascade Crest 100m such a wonderful race and trail family experience. Congratulations on hitting your 20!! year anniversary this year, and thank you for letting experience the magic. And finally, I'd like to thank my family and partner Jer for driving down to the race with me, taking on crew responsibilities so enthusiastically despite not knowing what they were signing up for, and my talented sister Claire for capturing my day so beautifully.

It takes a village for one person to finish one of these damn long races, and I've very thankful to have such an amazing team in my corner. 

How to Get to Where You Want to Be (and how that place will change as you go)
 PC: Chris Brinlee Jr

PC: Chris Brinlee Jr

Here's a little secret: you'll never "arrive" there, because you'll always realize that the process of getting there has opened up new possibilities you never even considered. And that's what keeps life from being boring. ;)

So I get lots of questions about how I got "here". How did I become a freelance photographer, graphic designer, and writer? How did I get into ultrarunning, and have I always been a runner? (mm, nope). How did I gain the technical experience and skills to do these epic trips in the mountains? Or how did I become an "influencer" (whatever that is), and how the hell am I able to do so much traveling and adventuring?? The answers to all of those things are intrinsically related, and I thought I'd start by giving you an overview of how I got here.

From there, get excited: I'm going to start breaking things down further in a new series of blog posts (annnnnd videos, coming soon!!)...because if there's anything I've learned along my journey, it's a whole lot of what NOT to do. And if I can save you from making some of those same mistakes, then yay! 


In the beginning, there was Ultra Running.

Alrighty. So my whole life really changed because of ultra running, if you want to boil things down to their essence. I was homeschooled for much of my childhood, graduated highschool at 16, and was what you'd call a "late bloomer".

I had quite a rocky start to adulthood, and I spent a bunch of time in hospitals when I was 18/19 being fairly sick (I'll get into more of that in later posts). When I finally emerged from that scary period of my life, I had a whole lot of muscle atrophy and a medical withdrawal from university to deal with. I decided to get a temporary job for "a little while" to pay off some student loans, stumbled into a great job in government road safety where I stayed for the next 7.5 years (so much for temporary), and then once I was back on my feet I began to rebuild my fitness and my life over the next few years. 

I started doing a lot of hiking in 2011, and discovered that I was MUCH happier working out in forests than I was on treadmills. That realization soon led to a lot of "hike up, and let gravity help me shuffle downhill", and I decided to enter my first trail race in 2013. I should note that up till then, the longest I had successfully run to date was the Vancouver Sun Run, a 10km road race, for which I trained for exactly once a year... aka just long enough to give myself a good set of shin splints, and then I'd quit running for the rest of the year. Trail running was a game changer, as the dreaded shin splints never made another appearance, and I found myself making trail friends and feeling like I was part of a community. It was a pretty awesome feeling.

Being the contrary and highly stubborn person that I am, all it took was one person telling me casually that there was no way I could run an ultra... and that was it. I signed up that night for the Squamish 50km in 2013, which was incidentally about two weeks away at the time. Let's just say I made every mistake in the book, and then some. I wore brand new insoles (meant for dress shoes, no less) in my runners, decided that I was nauseous and just wouldn't eat for the whole race (not like I knew what a gel was then anyways),  and pretty much crawled the last half of the race due to the GIANT blisters that my dress shoe insoles gave me. And yet, as I crossed the finish line and collapsed in the fetal position, I was hooked.

Over the next four years, I went on to run 18 ultra marathons of varying distances (from 50km way on up to 120 miles). I continued to make a lot of mistakes, but eventually I stopped making the same ones twice, and I slowly started getting stronger and faster. Being coached by the epic Gary Robbins and Eric Carter for three of those years probably had something to do with it too ;). Some fun highlights include a bunch of top 10 finishes, winning Fat Dog 70 mile, and placing 3rd at Fat Dog 120 mile. The crazy part is that not even five years before that happened, I literally couldn't run 10km without stopping to die a bunch of times.

So for those of you who tell me: "I really want to get into ultra running, but I was never a runner when I was younger so I think it's too late for me to pick up such a crazy sport", I'm here to tell you that you CAN if you want to. For me it was all about chipping away at these giant scary goals, and they slowly became more manageable as I went. 
 Only slightly delusional after 34 hours of running at Fat Dog 120 Miler

Only slightly delusional after 34 hours of running at Fat Dog 120 Miler

But enough about ultrarunning (only for now!). Like I said, I'm going to be tackling each of these topics individually in the next little while, and I'll get into the nitty gritty then. I've also got some pretty awesome before/after photos to dig out of the archives, so this is going to be FUN.

Oh, here's what my blisters looked like after my first 50km, just for shits and giggles.

You're welcome.

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Climbing and all that technical stuff.

As my ultrarunning grew, so did my interest in expanding my technical skills in the mountains. I had a desire to push myself further, to see how far I could go with my own two feet. And perhaps the biggest thing that drew me into rock climbing (followed by ice climbing and mountaineering), was my boyfriend Jeremy -- who just happened to be a highly skilled climber, mountaineer, and who taught in-demand ice climbing courses in the winter for the BC Mountaineering Club that sold out in minutes. To be honest, I don't know that I would have been able to learn the skills that I have now without having him to teach and mentor me and lead the way on terrain that I would have been scared shitless (and justifiably so) to tackle on my own... and I recognize that not everyone can tap into that sort of on-demand resource. It's something I want to chat more about, as well as what options exist for furthering your own backcountry skills -- but that's a whole other topic...perfect for another post. ;) 

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And then there was Photography.

As I got more involved in the ultrarunning and climbing communities, I realized that most of the sports photographers that I knew were male. In fact, I couldn't think of one local female sports/adventure photographer, when I stopped to think about it. This was very obvious when I helped put together the first Run Wild Vancouver fundraising initiative, and all 12 calendar photos were taken by male photographers, simply because we couldn't find any female photographers to submit work. I had begun dabbling in photography prior to this, teaching myself to use a DSLR because my iphone just wasn't capturing the grandeur of where my adventures took me. Once I realized how few female photographers were willing to haul heavy camera gear into the backcountry to capture some of these crazy sports, I decided that I was going to buck that trend. I spent hours and hours and hours reading every book I could get my hands on (my first book was literally "How to Use a DSLR For Dummies", watching youtube tutorials, and chasing my friends around on our long runs with my camera in hand, trying to get as much practice in as possible (bonus: carrying a 6lb camera in your hand while running for hours or climbing up a multi-pitch route makes you super strong on half of your body, and only a little bit lopsided). 

 PC: Antonio Villalobos

PC: Antonio Villalobos

Somewhere in here, brands started reaching out to me, and I realized that there was a demand for this style of inspiring adventure photography. 

My photography continued to grow, which led to...


Travel and Influencing, and all that fun stuff

It became harder to balance working my 9-5 corporate job with this new world of exciting freelance opportunities, and I found myself stretching and teasing my vacation allotments to let me take advantage of it all. A trip to Kenya with Lifestraw in 2015 was quite simply life-changing, as we spent ten whirlwind days working in the most rural areas possible to provide clean water to schoolchildren. I can honestly say that that trip changed my life, and made me realize that in amongst the shallowness of social media, there was a real opportunity to use it as a platform for positive awareness and change as well. I decided that I would try to use it as such, whether by inspiring other people to get outside through my photography, or just by being as real as possible with my own muddlings through life. 

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Other trips popped up after that: a weekend of running, camping, and photographing an extreme adventure trip for Under Armour in the desolate Death Valley;

 Squad life.

Squad life.

Then there was a whirlwind three day trip to the Lake District in the UK with Inov-8 that I crammed in between school exams (more on that shortly), and numerous trips around the States, mostly with Lifestraw. 

 My foray into fell running. PC: Stephen Wilson

My foray into fell running. PC: Stephen Wilson

Side note. The key to being an influencer, or building a brand that people respond to, is all about consistency. You have to know what you want to talk about and be passionate about it, have a strong and consistent voice (ie don't post shots of your breakfast if you want adventure brands to hire you), and be genuine. Remember that when you work with brands and vouch for their products, you are putting your reputation out there... so unless you genuinely love it, don't say you do.  

I was getting more and more freelance work as my photography and brand grew throughout 2015/16, and it got harder and harder to balance my passions with holding down my corporate job, so...

I quit, at the end of the summer in 2016. And then I stepped back from all the work I'd been doing on the side, said no to most of the cool opportunities, and went back to school. Because here's the thing: I was entirely self-taught up until that point, and I recognized that I was limited in the scope of what I could do. And I still had big dreams of where I wanted to go. So I signed up for an intensive graphic design program jointly run by Emily Carr University of Art and Design and the BC Institute of Technology, and threw myself completely into this crazy 2-years-in-one, fulltime-at-two-schools-at-once program. Except for, you know, the occasional blitz trip to Europe to try out fell running on weekends, which I couldn't quite resist. 


Striking out on my own

Six days after I graduated from school in October 2017, I found myself on a plane to Nepal, as part of a team of five heading into the Himalayas. I was the only girl on the team, and I was ridiculously excited. You can check out some stuff about that trip here.

When I finally got back from that trip at the end of 2017 (and after a 'lil blitz climbing detour to Thailand to thaw out after the Himalayan cold), I hit the ground running. I've spent the last six months pitching brands left, right, and center on project ideas, writing for magazines, taking on graphic and web design projects, and trying to establish semi-regular partnerships with brands to create a foundation that I can then layer one-off projects on top of. The key is to expect to hear a whole lot of crickets even when you think your idea is awesome, and to continue believing that your ideas are awesome anyways. Because that's part of the game, but you will also slowly get a sense of how to improve so that your work gets seen, and if you persist long enough, it'll start to pay off. Ideas that I pitched 6 months ago are now finally taking shape, but by the time I execute them it will have been nine months since I first floated them. You just have to go with the flow.

I've discovered how challenging it is to manage your own business and continue to drum up new projects while you are in remote areas with very little wifi for weeks at a time. I've realized that I don't think I could live on the road full-time, and I actually like having some structure in my life, at least some of the time (and it makes it a lot easier to train consistently for my own races). 


So, that's the short version of how I got here. I think the key thing to remember is that change doesn't happen instantly. You have to look at where you want to go, and then figure out how many steps it's going to take to make those changes. It's always more work than you want it to be, and it's always harder than you think it should be. But if it were easy, everyone would do it ;).

Like I've said, I've learned a LOT as I've muddled along on this little adventure of mine... and while some of it has been just pure luck or the right timing (and I'm very grateful for the opportunities I've had), a lot of where I am today has come from putting my head down, working hard even when life has tossed some huge hiccups at me, and refusing to quit. There are no shortcuts. Truly. So stop looking for the quick fix, and start planning your end game.

I'm looking forward to getting into more nitty-gritty details over the next little while -- so stay tuned, and let me know if you have specific questions you want me to answer!

Hil

 Circa 2012? This hurt a bit. (On this fine day, I had decided to spontaneously go for an ultramarathon-length 12 hour, 46km hike... long before I ever ran or trained for those distances). We all have to start somewhere!

Circa 2012? This hurt a bit. (On this fine day, I had decided to spontaneously go for an ultramarathon-length 12 hour, 46km hike... long before I ever ran or trained for those distances). We all have to start somewhere!

 

 

Am I still an Ultra runner if I’m not Ultra racing? 
 Mmm mud. Photo: Adam Ciuk

Mmm mud. Photo: Adam Ciuk

  • 2013: Three 50km races
  • 2014: Five 50km races, one 50 mile race
  • 2015: Three 50km races, one 100km race, one 70 mile race
  • 2016: Two 50km races, one 100km race, one 120 mile race
  • 2017: One 100 mile DNS 

In the past five years I've raced 18 ultras and had one DNS (did not start). Except I haven't actually raced anything since 2016. Which means that I actually ran 18 ultras in four years and then dropped off the face of the racing planet unintentionally. Oops. But why?

My first-ever Ultra race was in August, 2013. I signed up two weeks before, woefully unprepared, and had my ass handed to me. And yet my first thought as I crawled across the finish line was “when can I do this again”? By the time August 2014 rolled around, I’d run seven 50km races, possessed with more enthusiasm than common sense. I equated quantity with quality, and it wasn’t until I started training with Gary Robbins that I started to understand the concept of pacing and recovery. In other words, I chilled the fuck out, and started focusing on racing smarter, not just more. 

 Aww, baby ultrarunner Hilary at Orcas 50km. Photo: Glenn Tachiyama

Aww, baby ultrarunner Hilary at Orcas 50km. Photo: Glenn Tachiyama

In the following 12 months, I ran another six ultras, but strategically — separating them into “A” and “B” goals, with the “B” goals thrown in as I built up my base fitness from 50 km to 50 miles and finally 70 miles, at Fat Dog 70 miler. By doing so, I avoided race fatigue, using the races as training milestones heading into my goal race of the year. I ended up taking first place female at that race, which pretty much affirmed that I was doing something right. The following year I set Fat Dog 120 miler as my goal race, and found myself again racing less as my races got longer. 

 My first winning of a thing! Very exciting. Fat Dog 70mile, 2015. Photo: Brian McCurdy

My first winning of a thing! Very exciting. Fat Dog 70mile, 2015. Photo: Brian McCurdy

With longer races, too, came the need for more recovery time. After Fat Dog 120 miler, I just felt wiped. I needed some down time, and it took me a solid three months to even WANT to run again. When I did start running again, it was while trying to juggle the demands of the hectic graphic design program that I was enrolled in, and I decided to limit my racing to one giant goal race and spend the rest of the year training and focusing on school. You see, it isn’t just the races themselves that are demanding. Hidden costs included the time it takes to get to the race, the actual race, the return trip home, the cost of accommodations and travel, and the time spent tapering and recovering for the race (typically two weeks before, two weeks after, and much longer when they get over 100km).

So for 2017 I made a conscious choice to only pick one race: the Cascade Crest 100 miler. I trained my butt off all summer while juggling full-time school and work, sacrificing sleep and fitting runs in even when I felt like a walking zombie. Six weeks out, I remember feeling that I had actually pulled it off — I felt stronger than I’d ever felt before, I’d logged quality miles and higher-than-ever amounts of elevation gain, and I was so excited to actually line up at a start line again. 

 Putting those miles in the bank. Photo: Adam Ciuk

Putting those miles in the bank. Photo: Adam Ciuk

And then, about half an hour after I finished thinking those things, I broke my big toe while bombing down from the Whistler alpine. One classic Hilary faceplant, and bam. Goodbye 100 miler plans. See ya later Cascade Crest. I have to admit, I found this one a pretty bitter pill to swallow. Not only was it my first DNS, but I just felt that I’d put so.much.time. into training (and away from school), and it seemed cruel that after all of that sacrifice I wouldn’t have anything to show for it.

 I never do anything by half measures. Photo: Stephen Wilson

I never do anything by half measures. Photo: Stephen Wilson

Frustrated and unable to run, I booked a one-way ticket to Nepal right after my school program ended in October, and switched focuses from running to climbing and trekking. Between when I broke my toe (late July) and when I got home from Nepal (mid-December), I ran exactly 3 times. TOTAL. 

 Professional pack mule, I am. Nepal, 2017. Photo: Chris Brinlee Jr

Professional pack mule, I am. Nepal, 2017. Photo: Chris Brinlee Jr

I began questioning during that period whether I could actually still call myself an ultra runner - I mean, if I wasn’t ultra racing, what would I tell people I was working towards? It seemed so underwhelming to simply talk about being a trail runner, without having some sort of epic goal on the horizon. And then I realized how ridiculous that was. My love of trail running has always come from the adventures I’ve had, not the races I’ve done. And even though I didn’t get the chance to race in 2017, I still got to go on all of the incredible runs that formed my training — which is the best part of ultrarunning anyways.

A few weeks ago, I photographed the Coastal Challenge, which is a 235km six day stage race in Costa Rica.  As I watched each runner cross the finish line after six days of battling epic terrain and facing their inner demons, I realized something. Being an ultra runner has nothing to do with how much racing I am (or am not) doing. It has everything to do with understanding what it takes to finish these epic endeavours, be it a race, an FKT, or just a "hard for you" challenge. There's a camaraderie that comes with those shared experiences that is incredibly special.

 SLOWLY EVOLVING INTO A RAISIN. PHOTO: GERARDO VILLALOBOS

SLOWLY EVOLVING INTO A RAISIN. PHOTO: GERARDO VILLALOBOS

Races make excellent goalposts. They can provide training incentive, help us push farther than we otherwise would have, and provide progress markers. However, they do not define us as runners or what we are capable of, and they are but one piece of the puzzle. In the same way that "getting obsessed with training data (hello Strava users, I'm looking at you) to the point where you can't enjoy your run unless you are logging it for the world to see" isn't healthy, I think it's important to find balance with racing and running. In a sport notorious for overtraining and burnout, balance = longevity. Races are exciting and rewarding, sure, but ultimately why do we run? We run to see how far we can go, and for the love of it. 

FYI: I'll be lining up at my first ultramarathon start line since 2016 this August at Cascade Crest 100. Wish me much luck and no broken toes!

Step to the Beat — Lessons in Learning How to Pick up my Feet.

So I've never been much of a road runner. I only became a runner at all because I fell in love with the lush trails of the pacific northwest and figured that trail running was an efficient way to explore them. Even when I've had a coach and followed structured training plans, I've still gone out of my way to avoid running on roads or gravel paths — mostly because I get bored very quickly if I'm not constantly worrying about face planting on technical trails.  

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Cue Vi.

She's a personal training system that measures everything from your heart rate, steps per minute, and activity. The headphones are linked to an app that tracks GPS and logs your workouts. However, when Sportchek originally approached me to try out Vi, I have to confess that I was a bit skeptical. Having run almost twenty ultramarathons in the past five years, it's pretty easy to feel as if I've got my training routine down pat, and the thought of using a personal "coach" that talked to me during runs didn't seem that necessary.

That said, I'd already decided to run every day in January as a way to kick my butt back into training gear, so it seemed like a good opportunity to put Vi through her paces. And after training with her voice in my head for the last month, I feel like I can safely say that there are still things about my running that need improvement (shocker). 

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So without further ado, here's what I really like about Vi:

She gets personal.

When you first set up the accompanying app, you enter your height, weight, and training goals. Vi tracks your heart rate throughout workouts, and the more you use the app the more she gets to know you and what your baseline is (and she'll give you sh*t if you slack off, too!).

Set those goals.

When you open the app at the beginning of your run, you can select the workout that suits your goals. Decide if you are running, cycling, or using a treadmill, then choose between workout options that focus on time, distance, speed, or nothing at all. Vi will customize her mid-run feedback based on your goals. 

Steps per Minute.

This is by far my favourite feature. As you run, Vi measures your cadence and tells you what your steps per minute is, as well as what your "most efficient" steps per minute pace is. This is not to be confused with how fast you are going - it's simply how quick your cadence is. Improving your turnover means greater efficiency while running, and it's something that I have never been very good at achieving (and also, I've never found an easy way to measure my steps per minute mid-run on my own). Many trail races have long stretches of forest service roads, and there are obvious benefits to improving your running efficiency in order to take advantage of more runnable sections of terrain during races. 

So how does it work? After several Km's, Vi will give you an update on your progress (heart rate, distance, steps per minute). If you are like me, she'll then suggest that you should pick up your feet a little more, and offer to play an up-tempo beat that you can run in time with. If you say "yes" when prompted, you're set! She'll give you several minutes of at-tempo beats, and then let you know if you've successfully increased your steps per minute. From there, she will periodically check in to let you know if you are still on track.

After consciously working on my pace and trying to maintain a consistent number of steps per minute, I found myself starting to naturally correcting my cadence on my own. I also found that I was consistently getting closer to my "optimal efficiency" (176 steps per minute). 

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What I didn't like:

GPS limitations.

Vi is definitely intended for more urban running than trail networks, as the GPS struggles to find itself once you get into dense or forested areas.

Vi talks a lot. 

To be fair, there are multiple settings you can have for how much Vi interacts with you mid-run, and I mostly had mine set to a moderate level of engagement. While I did find it hard to get used to having her interact with me while I ran, at the same time she often offers useful feedback so I wouldn't suggest turning her off completely. 

Bonus:

The Vi headphones are sweat-proof bluetooth headphones with amazing Harman / Kardon audio, and it integrates perfectly with Spotify / your fav music. 

Verdict:

Vi is for much more than just "learning how to run", which is what I had initially assumed she'd be best at. I'm actually quite impressed at how specific you can be with your training goals. My goal for the month was to get faster, and so Vi's feedback and suggestions were aimed at making me more efficient. I also appreciate that you can plan specific sprint or HIIT workouts — and considering how much trouble I have convincing myself to do interval training on my own, it's nice to have the motivation literally in your head during those harder workouts. 

*Disclaimer: this post is made possible through a sponsored collaboration with SportChek. All opinions expressed are entirely my own. 

Hilary MathesonComment
MY PERFECT TRAIL

What makes a perfect trail? Is it finding a nice, easy loop of exactly five miles that starts right outside your front door? Or is it having a secret route that no one else knows about - a place where you can go to escape the world?

 That "ahh" moment.&nbsp;

That "ahh" moment. 

For me, defining a "perfect trail" is a tall order. There are many trails that are perfect in that moment. Sometimes I'll go out for a run without a clear idea of where I'm going, other than where I'm starting. There's nothing more peaceful in that moment than letting my feet guide me through the forest, chasing rabbit trails and exploring new-to-me terrain. And there are other days where I take great satisfaction in planning the perfect route ahead of time - one that combines whatever mixture of hills or runnable single track might fit the day's training agenda. 

The truth that I keep coming back to is that trail running equals freedom. The ability to lace up your runners and strike out on an adventure of varying length on your own two feet is a privilege, and one that I never want to take for granted. 

 Kapow!&nbsp;Badass runner Heather Bretschneider shows off her infectious love of all things trail.&nbsp;

Kapow! Badass runner Heather Bretschneider shows off her infectious love of all things trail. 

When I first discovered the trails, it was through hiking. As I got more confident, I slowly progressed to hiking the uphills and running the downhills and flats – basically going with gravity as much as possible. While I might “try” to run more than hike uphill nowadays, any trail runner can tell you that there’s still a fair amount of “power hiking” involved in any technical trail running, so some things haven’t changed all that much.

One thing I did realize early on in my trail running journey was that I sucked at downhill running. In races, I would bust my ass passing runners on the climbs, only to get caught and smoked by them as soon as we hit the downhills because I was tentative and unwilling to trust my feet. This frustrated me to no end, so I spent a good year consciously working on my downhill running techniques.

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This brings us to Ned’s Atomic Dustbin. Anyone who runs on the North Shore has probably tackled this black diamond downhill mountain bike trail. It’s technical, more roots and rocks than dirt, and it scared me shitless the first time I tried running down it. Therefore, I decided I was going to keep running it until I was no longer intimidated by it. And so I did, tackling that trail dozens of times over the course of a year in all sorts of weather and conditions. Slowly but surely I got faster at it, feeling out each turn and knowing where the treacherous drop-offs were. Most importantly, I started trusting my feet.

I may not have one perfect trail, but if I had to pick one trail that has changed my running in a very tangible way, this would be it. 

 Photo credit: Adam Ciuk (and yes, I love neon. How did you guess?)

Photo credit: Adam Ciuk (and yes, I love neon. How did you guess?)

Pro tip: I’m a very visual person. When I’m bombing downhill, I like to picture myself as a human pinball, ricocheting off each rock and root without staying on them long enough for them to slow me down. Another visual I’ve heard which I think is also an effective metaphor: picture a rock skipping on a lake. The lighter and quicker you are, the less likely you are to sink.

 Photo credit: Adam Ciuk

Photo credit: Adam Ciuk

Whether you are visual or would rather just turn your brain off altogether and rely on reflexes to keep you upright, the point is that good downhill technique takes time, patience and work. Find a trail that challenges you, run it until you feel comfortable on it, and then repeat the pattern with a new trail. Pretty soon it won’t matter what trail it is - you’ll be flying.

 Photo credit: Adam Ciuk

Photo credit: Adam Ciuk

Thanks to Bauerfeind Sports for challenging me to think about my "perfect trail"!

Hilary Matheson
A crash course in fell running

Hindsight is everything. Photo credit: Stephen Wilson

For my fell running debut, I wanted to make an entrance.

Instead, I settled for a crash landing.

My introduction began innocuously enough, with a surprise invitation from Inov-8 to join them in the Lake District for a whirlwind weekend of running through fells. Being Canadian and used to large-scale mountains, I barely knew what a fell was (is it a mountain? A hill? What exactly do the Brits define as a mountain anyway?), but I was ready to throw myself into this new venture. 

There were seven of us, from all over the world. We were the lucky winners of Inov-8's "Get a Grip" competition, which brought together runners from a variety of backgrounds with the goal of introducing us to the sport that was so ingrained in the Northern UK culture (and almost nowhere else). Our mission for the weekend: get a crash course in fell running technique and race the Skiddaw Classic, which featured a ten mile run up and down Skiddaw, one of the highest fells in the Lake District.

We arrived in Keswick on the Friday (pronounced Kessick with no "w", don't ask me why), a motley crew of bleary-eyed and jet-lagged travellers. Even through our fatigue, though, we could see that there was a certain kind of magic to this moody land. The town lay nestled among what seemed like an endless horizon of rolling fells of varying heights and steepness, partly shrouded in cloud, which only added to the mystery. Just how high were those peaks anyways? I suspected we would find out shortly.

Runners L-R: Adel Matanovic, Alex Garcia. Photo credit: Hilary Matheson

The day after our arrival saw us all up early and ready to tackle some fells. Our itinerary for the day included a "masterclass" (the polite way of saying crash course) in fell running techniques with accomplished runners Ben Mounsey and Mary Wilkinson. After getting kitted out at Inov-8's HQ (which is literally perched in the heart of the fell running district), we took to the fells with more enthusiasm than finesse. 

I quickly learned the first of several fell running lessons:  Don't even think about walking.  

We started off with what would become familiar quickly: ascending. As we climbed the faint game trails that seemed to go right up the steepest part of the ridges (the Brits call that taking the most efficient route), I yearned for the lung-saving switchbacks I was accustomed to. And as I watched Mary and Ben run uphill past me without seeming out of breath at all, I realized that fell runners don't slow to a power hike until the grade is nearly vertical. 

Once I established that my lungs were woefully unprepared to cope with this unfamiliar approach to hills, we switched focus to tackle downhill techniques. I soon learned my next fell running lesson: there is no such thing as a braking system. The best way to tackle the downhill is to throw yourself down the hill in the most expedient manner possible (read: fastest, with the least amount of care for one's noggin possible). And somehow, miraculously, they mostly stay upright. The image that came to mind as I watched Ben navigate the pockmarked terrain with ease was that of a rock skipping over a lake. If you get it going fast enough, it takes longer for it to sink. But at least in my case, sink it does, eventually.

Photo credit: James Carnegie

The Race

Speaking of sinking, on Sunday we tackled Skiddaw. At 3,054 feet, it's the sixth highest fell in England. While that may not be that big by my Canadian standards, it still qualifies as a properly steep mountain, especially when one is dragging oneself up only to hurtle oneself down again at (as Ben would say) "a bit of a pace". That's what's also known as an understatement.

There's a great sense of community at these fell races, which is probably what has made this niche sport so enduring. Families dropped off baked goods and cucumber sandwiches at the start line, creating an informal pot luck for hungry and muddy runners to enjoy post-race. Lean, weather-hardened men and women wear singlets and split shorts, despite the mandatory gear requirements that include carrying a waterproof jacket and pants. I shivered next to them in long sleeves and tights.

With a low key "Go!" we were off at a startlingly fast pace, and I knew within two minutes that my ultra-running conditioned body (ie. capable of slow gears only) wasn't going to be any good on this course. The route followed a well established and steep game trail up the ridge crest to the summit. Five miles straight uphill from the middle of town, and then five miles back the way you came. Even I can do the math on that one and realize that ten miles at the pace we were running was going to feel about as painful as 100 miles at my normal ultra shuffle pace. 

As the grade quickly got steeper, I was passed by a steady stream of local runners who were probably 25 years older than me - all somehow still running uphill long after I had switched to hiking with my hands on my quads. Mental note to self: must improve my uphill game. 

Split shorts and side stitches. Photo credit: James Carnegie

The top third of the mountain had been playing coy all morning, hidden in a menacing looking cloud. Sure enough, once we hit the cloud line the temperature plummeted, and I realized why we had been asked to carry such beefy emergency gear during a summer race. It was both cold and disorienting, and the wind was strong enough that I struggled to stand upright. In that moment, I realized how quickly a jaunt in the fells could go sideways if given a little bit of side eye from Mother Nature. 

I reached the top of Skiddaw with little fanfare and if it hadn't been for the shivering volunteers and a lonely cairn to mark the summit, I wouldn't have even know where I was - I could barely see my hand in front of my face through the fog and cloud. All I knew was that I wanted to get off of the top of the damn mountain as quickly as possible, and it seemed like a good time to test out the fell running brakeless descent technique.

Downhill trail running in Vancouver usually involves playing cautious ping pong off of roots and rocks, so it was a treat to be able to open up my legs, trust my Inov-8 shoes to do their thing, and just let go. I whooped and hollered as I flew down the hill, exchanging cheers and high-fives with my fellow teammates as I went. The world merged into an exhilarating whirl of grass, gravel and sky, until I was suddenly jolted out of this euphoric state of flow by a rude realization: my legs were moving faster than my reflexes could control. Lacking the Road Runner's control at high speeds, I ended up like Wile E. Coyote; though fortunately I landed in a ditch, not at the bottom of a cliff.

Luckily, I actually bounced right out of my fall and back onto my feet with very little consequence aside from a bruised ego. I remember yelling at a concerned farmer who had watched my impressive fall in shock, "at least no one caught that on camera!!" as I flew by, unaware that I'd been busted by local race photographer Stephen Wilson, who just happened to be stationed at the precise corner where I decided to wipe out. 

Thankfully the rest of the race unfolded without additional displays of my klutziness. Before I knew it I was collapsing on the grass at the finish line, then happily partaking in an eclectic pot luck and comparing war wounds with my fellow teammates and racers.  Every other finisher seemed to be bleeding from at least one part of their body, and I realized that the ability to ignore pain is fundamental to one's success as a fell runner.

Full disclosure: I'm still not quite sure whether fells are hills or mountains. All I know is that they are steep going up, and scary coming down. We were each given a copy of Richard Askwith's fell running masterpiece "Feet in the Clouds" upon our arrival in Keswick, and I've been delving into stories of local legends and epic feats in recent weeks. Challenges such as the infamous Bob Graham Round, in which a runner covers 42 Lake District Peaks in 24 hours, have now made it onto my personal adventure bucket list, and I have no doubt that I'll be back in the fells soon, ready to tackle new adventures (and hopefully to stay upright for a little longer). Until then, I'll keep aspiring to what Askwith deems a key component of successful fell running: "a disregard for pain and danger that verges on lunacy."

Team Inov-8 "Get a Grip", having no fun at all. Photo credit: James Carnegie

 

 

Hilary Matheson